In a factory fresh installation of Interlok; the JMXServiceURL property in bootstrap.properties is set to be the reference implementation jmxmp. This implementation is fine if the adapter is running in the local network and there are no issues with making connections to the Interlok instance from your browser. However, depending on how the adapter will be deployed, it may be that it will be behind a firewall, and will only allow limited connections; and certainly not unencrypted socket connections. In these types of deployment scenarios; where you may have to traverse firewalls to get to the adapter; it may be useful to proxy all JMX requests over a JMS Queue or Topic. This is where the optional/jmx-jms component comes into action; you will need to copy all the jars in that directory into the main adapter lib directory.

Although core functionality has been implemented to handle remote JMX over JMS, there are some contracts which are not fulfilled. The most important one is the behaviour of JMXConnectorServer.getConnectionIds() and JMXConnector.getConnectionId(). The JMS provider provide connectivity so clients aren’t directly connected to our JmsJmxConnectorServer implementation, requests just appear on a given Destination and we service them. As a result, you will find that the JMXConnectorServer.getConnectionIds() will return an empty string, and although JMXConnector.getConnectionId() will return a conventional connection ID, it is only consistent for the lifetime of the underlying JMS connection and cannot be cross-referenced with anything.

Communication via both Queue and Topic are supported, each request will create a temporary destination matching the target destination type for responses. Notifications are received and handled via a separate temporary destination.


SonicMQ

To switch to using SonicMQ as the JMX transport mechanism we simply start using sonicmq instead of jmxmp as the protocol part of the JMXServiceURL along with a URL that specifies the connection to the SonicMQ broker instance along with some specific environment properties which should be self explanatory. jmxservice.env. is the prefix that indicates that this property should be passed through to the initial environment when invoking JMXConnectorFactory.newJMXConnector(). This prefix is stripped off before the property is added to the initial environment.

adapterConfigUrl=file://localhost/./config/adapter.xml
managementComponents=jmx:jetty
jmxserviceurl=service:jmx:sonicmq:///tcp://localhost:2506
jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.brokerUser=Administrator
jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.brokerPassword=Administrator
jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.type=Topic
jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.destination=SampleQ4

The various environment properties may also be specified as part of the JMXServiceURL, so you could specify service:jmx:sonicmq:///tcp://localhost:2506?jmx.type=Topic&jmx.destination=SampleQ4 which achieves the same thing. For SonicMQ the default username and password defaults to Administrator/Administrator; so we have missed it out from the URL for clarity. The full list of supported properties are

Name Description
jmx.type The destination type (i.e. Topic or Queue; case-sensitive); defaults to Topic.
jmx.destination The name of a Topic or Queue; if not assigned, then a unique one will be created to avoid exceptions; this is, though, pointless from a usability perspective
jmx.brokerUser The username to connect to the broker (if required); defaults to ‘Administrator’.
jmx.brokerPassword The password to connect to the broker (if required); defaults to ‘Administrator’.
jmx.timeout The timeout in milliseconds for a client to wait for a reply after sending a request; defaults to 60000.
jmx.clientid The client ID to be associated with the underlying progress.message.jclient.ConnectionFactory if desired; defaults to null.
jmx.backupBrokers A comma separated list of additional brokers that should serve as a list of backup brokers. Note that doing this as part of the URL will make it hard to read, so that should be discouraged from maintainability point of view, it will be best to add the backup brokers as part of the initial environment

All properties are case sensitive; you can mix and match the environment with the URL, the URL will take precedence, apart from in the case where JMXConnector.CREDENTIALS exists in the initial set of attributes, that will always replace the brokerUser and brokerPassword.


ActiveMQ

To switch to using ActiveMQ as the JMX transport mechanism we simply start using activemq instead of jmxmp as the protocol part of the JMXServiceURL along with a URL that specifies the connection information for the ActiveMQ broker. Configuration for ActiveMQ tends to specified completely via the URL, so anything that would be valid as part of an ActiveMQ URL tends to be valid as part of the JMXServiceURL. So our bootstrap.properties might end up looking like this:

adapterConfigUrl=file://localhost/./config/adapter.xml
managementComponents=jmx:jetty
jmxserviceurl=service:jmx:activemq:///tcp://localhost:61616?jmx.type=Topic&jmx.destination=jmxTopic
# Not required because everything is in the url.
# jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.type=Topic
# jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.destination=jmxTopic

The full list of supported properties that control JMX behaviour are as follows :

Name Description
jmx.type The destination type (i.e. Topic or Queue; case-sensitive); defaults to Topic.
jmx.destination The name of a Topic or Queue; if not assigned, then a unique one will be created to avoid exceptions; this is, though, pointless from a usability perspective
jmx.brokerUser The username to connect to the broker (if required); defaults to null. This may be a redundant; as you can often configure the username directly on the URL
jmx.brokerPassword The password to connect to the broker (if required); defaults to null. This is likely to be redundant; as you can often configure the password directly on the URL.
jmx.timeout The timeout in milliseconds for a client to wait for a reply after sending a request; defaults to 60000.
jmx.clientid The client ID to be associated with the underlying ActiveMQConnectionFactory if desired; defaults to null.

All keys are case sensitive, and if specified in the URL will be stripped before being passed to ActiveMQConnectionFactory so, for service:jmx:activemq:///tcp://localhost:61616?jmx.type=Topic&jmx.destination=jmxTopic; both jmx.type and jmx.destination will be stripped from the URL (leaving tcp://localhost:61616) before being passed to ActiveMQConnectionFactory. Each of the properties may also be specified in the initial environment as per the SonicMQ example, the URL will take precedence, apart from in the case where JMXConnector.CREDENTIALS exists in the initial set of attributes, that will always replace the brokerUser and brokerPassword.


Solace

Since 3.6.4, you can switch to using Solace as the JMX transport mechanism using solace instead of jmxmp as the protocol part of the JMXServiceURL along with a URL that specifies the connection to the Solace broker instance along with some specific environment properties which should be self explanatory. jmxservice.env. is the prefix that indicates that this property should be passed through to the initial environment when invoking JMXConnectorFactory.newJMXConnector(). This prefix is stripped off before the property is added to the initial environment.

adapterConfigUrl=file://localhost/./config/adapter.xml
managementComponents=jmx:jetty
jmxserviceurl=service:jmx:solace:///smf://localhost:55555
jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.brokerUser=default
jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.type=Topic
jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.destination=jmxTopic
jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.messageVPN=default

The various environment properties may also be specified as part of the JMXServiceURL, so you could specify service:jmx:solace:///smf://localhost:55555?jmx.type=Topic&jmx.destination=jmxTopic which achieves the same thing. For Solace the default username and password defaults to default along with an empty password. The full list of supported properties are

Name Description
jmx.type The destination type (i.e. Topic or Queue; case-sensitive); defaults to Topic.
jmx.destination The name of a Topic or Queue; if not assigned, then a unique one will be created to avoid exceptions; this is, though, pointless from a usability perspective
jmx.brokerUser The username to connect to the broker (if required); defaults to ‘default’.
jmx.brokerPassword The password to connect to the broker (if required); defaults to ‘’.
jmx.timeout The timeout in milliseconds for a client to wait for a reply after sending a request; defaults to 60000.
jmx.clientid The client ID to be associated with the underlying SolConnectionFactory if desired; defaults to null.
jmx.messageVPN The message VPN to use with the underlying SolConnectionFactory; defaults to ‘default’
jmx.backupBrokers A comma separated list of additional brokers that should serve as a list of backup brokers. Note that doing this as part of the URL will make it hard to read, so that should be discouraged from maintainability point of view, it will be best to add the backup brokers as part of the initial environment

All properties are case sensitive; you can mix and match the environment with the URL, the URL will take precedence, apart from in the case where JMXConnector.CREDENTIALS exists in the initial set of attributes, that will always replace the brokerUser and brokerPassword.


AMQP 1.0

AMQP 1.0 support is provided by the Apache Qpid library. To switch to using AMQP as the JMX transport mechanism we simply start using amqp instead of jmxmp as the protocol part of the JMXServiceURL along with a URL that specifies the connection information for the AMQP 1.0 broker. Configuration for Qpid tends to specified completely via the URL, so anything that would be valid as part of an URL will be valid as part of the JMXServiceURL. So our bootstrap.properties might end up looking like this:

adapterConfigUrl=file://localhost/./config/adapter.xml
managementComponents=jmx:jetty
jmxserviceurl=service:jmx:amqp:///amqp://guest:guest@localhost:5672?clientid=test-client&jmx.type=Topic&jmx.destination=jmxTopic
# Not required because everything is in the url.
# jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.type=Topic
# jmxserviceurl.env.jmx.destination=jmxTopic

The full list of supported properties that control JMX behaviour are as follows :

Name Description
jmx.type The destination type (i.e. Topic or Queue; case-sensitive); defaults to Topic.
jmx.destination The name of a Topic or Queue; if not assigned, then a unique one will be created to avoid exceptions; this is, though, pointless from a usability perspective
jmx.brokerUser The username to connect to the broker (if required); defaults to null. This may be a redundant; as you can often configure the username directly on the URL
jmx.brokerPassword The password to connect to the broker (if required); defaults to null. This is likely to be redundant; as you can often configure the password directly on the URL.

All keys are case sensitive, and if specified in the URL will be stripped before being passed to the Qpid ConnectionFactory so, for service:jmx:amqp:///amqp://guest:guest@localhost:5672?clientid=test-client&jmx.destination=jmxTopic; then jmx.destination will be stripped from the URL leaving amqp://guest:guest@localhost:5672?clientid=test-client. Each of the properties may also be specified in the initial environment as per the SonicMQ example, the URL will take precedence, apart from in the case where JMXConnector.CREDENTIALS exists in the initial set of attributes, which will always replace the brokerUser and brokerPassword.

Tags: advanced